Recent MetaFAQs, TUPdates, and Highlights

This page lists the most recent TUP analysis. MetaFAQs, TUPdates, and Highlights are listed below beginning with the most recent releases first.

For a brief summary of recent findings, please visit our What’s New page.

MetaFAQs address a specific current or often-asked question. TUPdates drill more deeply into TUP to cover a topic in more detail. Highlights are broader analyses for a specific TUP lens.

Recent MetaFAQs, TUPdates, and Highlights

  • Profile of Americans who sell things online
    Nearly a fourth of online Americans regularly sell things online, making it widespread enough to be of interest, yet rare enough not to be mainstream. The type of people selling things online tend to be younger, from later generations, and gainfully employed. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentage of online Americans who regularly sell things online split by sociodemographic characteristics: employment status, presence of children, age group, generation, gender, and generational life phase. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0306_sell] in TUP Lenses: Activities; User Profile
  • Gen Z and millennials are the strongest consumers of printing services
    Gen Z and millennials live life on the move, and how they print is no exception. These generations are twice as likely to use retail or online printing services as Gen X adults and four times as likely as the earlier Boomer/Silent generations. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentage of online adults in the US, Germany, UK, Japan, and China who use self-service store kiosks, retail printing outlets, or online printing services, split by generational age groups. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0227_serv] in TUP Lenses: Printers; User Profile
  • HP printers lead active base in most countries
    HP leads the active installed base of printers, ahead of other brands in nearly every country surveyed. In Japan, however, other local brands dominate. This MetaFAQs reports on the primary printer brand of online Americans by age generation. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0226_prbr] in TUP Lenses: Printers
  • Boomers lead, Gen Z trails in printer use
    Printers are an actively used device by the majority of online adults around the world, although they are being used more by earlier than later generations. Gen Z adults in every country surveyed except Japan have the lowest levels of regular printer usage. The Boomer/Silent generations have the highest use in every country except Japan. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentage of online adults actively using a printer whether in their workplace, at home, school, or other location by country and age generation. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0225_prtr] in TUP Lenses: Printers; User Profile
  • Smartphone hours highest for Gen Z and millennials
    Younger smartphone users worldwide use smartphones for more hours on average than earlier generations. This is more strongly the case in Japan and among China’s elites. In the US, millennials lead or are on par with Gen Z adults. In the UK and Germany, millennials lead. This MetaFAQs reports on the weekly average hours adults use smartphones split by age generations and countries. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0223_hour] in TUP Lenses: Devices; Mobile Phones; User Profile
  • The size of the active creative class
    Renewed attention on AI (Artificial Intelligence) includes substantial promises to enhance the creative output of everyday users, something millions of people are already doing. Decades before widespread AI capabilities were incorporated into apps or hardware or even touted as feature enhancements, creative activities have been a regular part of many computer users’ lives and careers. The earliest adopters of any AI technology – and those that will continue to use and value the services – will be the already active creators. Non-creatives will show some initial curiosity, followed by disengagement. The extent of AI use by non-creatives will be is as a free or bundled enhancement service. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentage of online adults who regularly create graphics or presentations or use professional creative software. Each activity is further split by personal versus work-related use and age generation. The research results are based on 12,003 US, German, UK, and Japanese respondents. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0222_crea] in TUP Lenses: Activities; User Profile; Devices
  • US trails in employed online users
    Globally, four in ten to six in ten online adults are working full-time or part-time. The use of online devices has broadened well beyond employed persons to include adults with a wide variety of employment statuses: retired, students, self-employed, unemployed, or otherwise not employed outside of the home. Among the countries surveyed, the US has the lowest share of online adults employed full-time or part-time. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentage of online adults employed full-time or part-time. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0219_empl] in TUP Lenses: User Profile; Households
  • Tech use grows with household size
    Adults in larger households worldwide use more devices than those in smaller households, a trend that has been established for years. Even as people are using fewer devices, those with more people in their households continue to use more devices than the adults in smaller households. One key factor influencing a higher usage profile is the presence of children, especially school-aged kids. Also, many smaller households are composed of older adults or those not employed outside of the household. All of these are contributing factors towards the greater use of technology devices and services. This MetaFAQs reports on the average (mean) number of devices actively used (phones, computers, tablets) by adults by household size and country. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0217_many] in TUP Lenses: User Profile; Households
  • Most device hours are among younger workers
    Worldwide, the most active users of connected devices are younger workers. The hours people use devices like smartphones, computers, and tablets ranks second among either younger adults not employed outside of the home or older adults who are employed, varying by country. This MetaFAQs reports on the mean weekly hours that adults use connected devices by employment status and age group by country. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0215_ybus] in TUP Lenses: Devices; PCs; Mobile Phones; Tablets; User Profile; Work/Life Balance
  • Young adults strongly prefer Apple computers globally
    Globally, computer users aged 18 to 24 are twice as likely as 50+ users to be using an Apple computer. Among German adults, the ratio is the most extreme – more than four times wider. Germany has been a stronghold for Windows computers as well as Android smartphone and tablets, a factor that has been changing primarily with younger Germans. In Japan, the difference by age group is not as extreme, and Apple’s overall penetration is lower across the board. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentage of adult computer users who are using an Apple computer by age group and country. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0213_ymac] in TUP Lenses: PCs; User Profile; Technology Ecosystems
  • Younger–though not youngest–adults lead in device hours
    Worldwide, younger adults use their connected devices for more hours than older adults. The global average is driven in large part by the youthful enthusiasm of younger upper-SES Chinese adults along with extra-active younger Germans balancing out their less-intensive, although numerous, older counterparts. While it may seem convenient to imagine that youthfulness equates to higher device activity, it is not universally true, as 25 to 34-year-olds dominate usage averages in the US, Germany, and the UK. This MetaFAQs reports on the mean weekly hours that online adults use their smartphones, computers, and tablets split by age group and country. These results are based on the results of research on 13,498 online adults. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0211_yhrs] in TUP Lenses: Devices; User Profile
  • Older workers anticipate workplace return
    Worldwide, older workers express less likelihood of working remotely within a year’s time. Half or more of workers aged 40 and up in the UK and Germany do not expect to be working remotely in one year. Among younger adults in the UK and Germany, the share is closer to 40%. In all countries surveyed except Japan, younger adults have a lower share that do not expect to be working remotely in one year. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentage of working online adults– full-time, part-time, or self-employed– who do not expect to be working remotely in one year. These results are based on responses from 7,842 online adult workers in the US, Germany, UK, Japan, and China. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0209_owfh] in TUP Lenses: User Profile; Work/Life Balance
  • Remote workers pay their own phone bills
    Most remote workers cover their smartphone costs, even for work use. That is true regardless of whether they use their smartphones for work-related activities. For a fraction of workers whose fees are curtailed by the employer, workers in the UK have the highest share of being supported for their 2nd smartphone, with workers in Germany being a close second. Workers in Japan have the highest share of reimbursement for their primary smartphone. This compares to the related finding that home computers used for work are also primarily paid for by the worker, not the employer. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentage of online workers– full-time, part-time, or self-employed– who have their 1st, 2nd, and 3rd smartphone’s fees paid for or reimbursed by their employer, for the US, Germany, UK, Japan, and China. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0207_empc] in TUP Lenses: Mobile Phones; Work/Life Balance
  • American printing trends affected by employment, generation, education
    As a chilling trend for the printer industry, one of the fastest growing segments among Americans is the growing percentage of those who do not use a printer at home, at their workplace, in a school or library, or anywhere else. Furthermore, Gen Z adults, often considered a forerunner of market adoption, stand out for their disadoption. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentages of Americans based on their active printer and home printer usage in two mutually exclusive ways: those using any printer or no printer and those using a home printer or not using a home printer. We have split the results by generation – Gen Z, millennial, Gen X, Boomer, and Silent/Greatest – from 2010 through 2023. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0206_otpr] in TUP Lenses: Printers; User Profile
  • The unbundling of American home PCs and home printers
    The unbundling of American home PCs and home printers – One of the biggest home technology shifts among American adults involves their use (or non-use) of home computers and home printers. Only a decade ago, it was widespread practice to have both a home computer and home printer, and often to buy them at the same time. That has changed dramatically, as the number of Americans using both has plummeted. Instead, there has been substantial growth in the share of Americans using only a home printer or neither a home computer nor a home printer. This shift has played out differently among Gen Z and millennial Americans than among Gen X or Silent/Greatest generations. This MetaFAQs reports on the number and percentage of Americans by their combination of use and non-use of home computers and home printers. These are split by generational age group. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0205_core] in TUP Lenses: PCs; Printers; User Profile
  • Workers are just over half of all online adults, except in China
    Between one-half and six-tenths of online adults in the US, Germany, UK, and Japan are working. Among China’s higher-educated elites, the working rate among online adults is higher. In other words, the US has the broadest use of connected technology beyond working adults. This broad measure focuses on online adults of any age who are gainfully employed, which contrasts with labor force measures. Governmental measures of the active labor force are generally limited to specific age ranges such as ages 16 to 64 and only includes persons reporting that they are actively looking for work. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentage of online adults currently working full-time, part-time, or self-employed. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0205_empl] in TUP Lenses: User Profile; Households
  • The top American page makers
    The most active users of printers are generations in the middle, even while overall printer penetration is higher among earlier generations. Older millennial Americans have the very highest share of those who print more than 100 pages per month. Socioeconomic groups with higher incomes, further educational attainment, or children in the household include some of the busiest printer users. This MetaFAQs reports on the percentage of Americans printing 100 or more pages per month, split by generation and detailing penetration among many historically advantaged and disadvantaged socioeconomic groups. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0202_page] in TUP Lenses: Printers; User Profile
  • Home printer age by generation
    Earlier generations are using older printers than later generations. This is not completely due to the more recent household formation of Gen Z and millennial Americans, and instead is reflecting the inertia of earlier generations in home printer purchases and repurchases. This MetaFAQs reports on the age of home printers being used by American adults, split by detailed generational age groups, including Gen Z adults, younger and older millennials, Gen X, and Boomer Americans, as well as the Silent+Greatest generations. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0131_prag] in TUP Lenses: Printers; User Profile
  • Remote work pays: cross-country earnings compared
    Remote workers tend to earn more than their workplace-going counterparts. Various factors, including educational attainment, socioeconomic status, and job type, influence this. We found this positive association in the US, UK, Germany, Japan, and China. This MetaFAQs focuses on quantifying the income disparity, rather than determining the causal relationship between income levels and remote work. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0131_affl] in TUP Lenses: User Profile; Work/Life Balance
  • Game console usage sags among each generation; not game over among Gen Z
    Game consoles have been a fixture among a sizable portion of adults for decades, although each earlier generation continues to lose interest. Since 2018, fewer adults in later generations have actively used a game console with each passing year. This MetaFAQs reports on the multi-year change in the percentage of online adults in the US, Germany, the UK, Japan, and China who actively use a game console, split by age generation. Report [TUP_doc_2024_0130_cont] in TUP Lenses: User Profile; Activities; Game Consoles, Gaming PCs, and Game-Playing; Home Entertainment

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