Trends in webcam and video calls/meetings usage

Are video calls and meetings as widespread as tech media implies? How much have webcams and video calls and meetings reached into the everyday experience of the average online adult? This MetaFAQs reports on the usage trend since before the pandemic for online adults in the US, the UK, Germany, and Japan. It further splits video calling/conferencing by smartphone, home PC, or work PC. Furthermore, because change has not affected everyone the same, it details the trend among life stage segments – employment status, age group, and presence of children.

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Profile of Americans who regularly participate in video calls

As video plays an increasing role in our daily lives across social media and other communication platforms, it’s no surprise that video calls are also becoming more and more mainstream. 55% of all online American adults report regularly participating in video calls. This MetaFAQs profiles regular video call participants by several critical demographic and behavioral factors distinctive from the average American online adult: age and gender; employment status; life stage (age, employment status, presence of children); and technology ecosystem entrenchment. Report [TUP_doc_2022_0715_mode] in TUP Lenses: Activities, Communication.

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Communication TUP Lens Highlights

During the pandemic, employees suddenly working from home accelerated their use of videoconferencing, home computers, and other connected devices. Similarly, those not employed outside the home sought ways to stay connected with others or help their students continue their education. Communication activities ranging from videoconferencing to video calls, email, group chats, and text messaging are at the heart of these connections. Market adoption has not been assured nor evenly distributed, as only some segments adopted behaviors they continued. Meanwhile, other segments dallied with new communication methods and then returned to their old ways.
This TUP Highlights report includes the following sections: communication activities by device type, communication activities among those working from home, devices used for work-related communication, and top communication activities.

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Devices used for work video calls

Work-related video calls had been growing in use even before the pandemic. Platforms such as Apple Facetime, and video calling services within Microsoft Teams and Zoom helped them come into regular use, even while employees have many other ways to communicate – email, text, and collaboration platforms like Slack and Microsoft Teams. Nearly between 30% and 46% of employees in the US, UK, Germany, and Japan regularly use one of their connected devices to make or receive work-related video calls. This MetaFAQs reports on the number of employees regularly using their connected devices for work-related video calls, detailing each device type used – smartphone, home PC, work PC, or tablet – by the size of their employer – <20 employees, 20-499 employees, or 500+ employees.

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Communication activities by age group

Among the many ways people use their connected devices, communication remains central to most users’ activities. Communication became more important than ever as employees working from home sought to collaborate and meet during the pandemic. Simultaneously, people not employed outside the home reached out for connections and information. From video calls to group meetings such as using Zoom or Microsoft Teams, many users shifted their communication patterns and adopted new tools. This MetaFAQs report details the market penetration of regular use of many types of communication tools across the US, UK, Germany, and Japan, each split by age group.

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MetaFacts work from home study – [Highlights, MetaFacts Pulse Survey]

This TUPdate investigates and profiles working Americans who are working from home. With the COVID-19 pandemic and economic shifts taking place now, many are not technologically ready for a work-at-home or stay-at-home experience.

MetaFacts conducted a series of surveys during the periods March 26-30, 2020, and April 8, 2020.

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Usage guidelines: This document may be freely shared within and outside your organization in its entirety and unaltered. It may not be used with a generative AI system without separate licensing and express written permission. To share or quote excerpts, please contact MetaFacts.