Printer activity trends in US, Germany, UK, Japan, and China

Printer activity has declined around the world – in the US, Germany, UK, Japan, and China – even as printers are an active part of the majority of online adults. Printing activities include printing documents, web pages, reports, presentations, personal records, and even recipes. However, it’s important to note that not all online adults are actively engaged in this practice. The extent of printer usage varies considerably from one country to another, and this variation carries substantial implications for both printer manufacturers and the suppliers of consumables like ink, toner, and paper.

To provide valuable insights into this trend, we present the TUP tables 410 PRxCOUNTRY from 2017 through 2023, which offer a comprehensive overview of printer usage among online adults in five key markets: the United States, Germany, the United Kingdom, Japan, and China. This data encompasses the percentage of individuals in each country who have utilized a printer in the preceding 90 days, along with detailed information on the number of printers they have employed. Report [TUP_doc_2023_1210_prpt] in TUP Lenses: Printers

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Headcams – cultural precursor to VR headsets?

The growth potential for wearable video cameras, commonly termed “headcams” like GoPro, has been influenced by societal attitudes. Historically, there has been a hesitation to record others without consent, which could limit the broad adoption of such devices. However, cultural perspectives can and do evolve. Case in point: smartphone users’ widespread acceptance of taking photos and recording videos. Although cultural disapproval has been against wearables that are too obvious, such as on one’s head, that may change with time.

The rise of content creators on platforms like Instagram and TikTok suggests that the broader public might embrace headcams more. This trend could provide fresh opportunities for tech marketers to promote wearable video cameras of some kind to a new generation of users.

In virtual reality, there are considerations about the cultural reception of VR headset devices like Apple Vision Pro or Meta Quest 3. These devices’ positive reception could inform how headcams are perceived in the future.

Considering the media’s portrayal, a contemporary version of “The Truman Show” concept, where someone’s life is broadcasted in real-time, isn’t unthinkable, given past experiments with lifecasting in the 90s.

The metrics in this MetaFAQ provide a solid foundation for those analyzing tech trends: the number of adults across generations and countries using headcams versus smartphones for capturing videos and pictures. This data can provide insights into shifting user behaviors and preferences and help identify which generation may adopt headcams first and how far they have progressed.

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UK tech buyers boost buying while China’s elites hang on

The global landscape has witnessed significant shifts in consumer purchasing behavior due to the impact of the pandemic and broader economic changes. This transformation extends to acquiring tech products such as smartphones, computers, tablets, and game consoles. With the rapid transition to remote work, many individuals proactively invested in personal computing devices to enhance their productivity rather than relying on their employers for equipment provision.

Conversely, individuals facing reduced working hours or economic uncertainty opted to postpone their tech purchases. On a global scale, the mean age of a technology user’s primary device has exhibited relative stability, averaging between 1.9 and 2.1 years old over the past five years. However, a closer examination reveals notable variations across different countries.

The affluent and highly educated among China’s population has consistently maintained access to the latest tech devices. Nevertheless, a recent delay in 2023 has cast uncertainty on their leading position, potentially aligning them with the global average in the near future. In contrast, consumers in the UK, who amidst Brexit and the pandemic deferred tech device purchases, have demonstrated a two-year consecutive uptick in acquisitions. Consequently, their average device age now ranks second among surveyed countries.

Meanwhile, online adults in Germany and Japan have displayed a penchant for holding onto their primary devices longer compared to their international counterparts. These nuanced trends offer valuable insights for technology marketers, researchers, analysts, and industry professionals seeking to navigate evolving consumer preferences and market dynamics.

This MetaFAQs reports on the mean age of the respondent’s primary device – a smartphone, computer, tablet, or game console – by country from 2018 through 2023. Report [TUP_doc_2023_1207_yeat] in TUP Lenses: Devices; PCs; Mobile Phones; Tablets

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The active base of computer and printer users is declining

The world is shrinking, at least in terms of the share of adults using computers and printers. While both the computer and printer industries have enjoyed a growth-oriented mentality for decades, that orientation has slowed. Accepting this reality means that technology marketers need to orient towards replacement markets where users are focused on replacing or enhancing the technology they have. Also, it means that fewer users are first-time or new to technology. Instead, the base of users has experience that is deepening and lengthening. This MetaFAQs reports on the penetration of computers and printers among online adults in the US, Germany, UK, Japan, and China from 2021 through 2023. Report [TUP_doc_2023_0921_decl] in TUP Lenses: PCs; Printers

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Simplicity coalesces with smartphones

The long-term trend towards actively juggling many connected devices has reversed. It has even slid as users consolidate their activities on a smartphone. Furthermore, people use their devices for a narrower range of activities, simplifying their device collection and what they do with them.

Many users shifted to using a notebook and smartphone only to continue their shift using their notebooks less than before. Tablets offered to combine the best of computers and smartphones but instead have fallen into a gap between them. Meanwhile, the majority of people have migrated their activities onto their smartphones. Some of the motivation has been a quest for simplicity, although, in fact, convenience has driven more people. Economics have also played a part, spurred by the many shifts in work in response to the pandemic.

Only ten years ago, the average online adult regularly used as many as four types of devices, most frequently using a home computer, work computer, smartphone, and tablet. Although computers are still in active use, when they are being used, many have been relegated to specific tasks, such as shopping, watching videos, or intensive games.

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Usage guidelines: This document may be freely shared within and outside your organization in its entirety and unaltered. It may not be used with a generative AI system without separate licensing and express written permission. To share or quote excerpts, please contact MetaFacts.

UK tech buyers freshen up while China’s elites delay

The global landscape has witnessed significant shifts in consumer purchasing behavior due to the impact of the pandemic and broader economic changes. This transformation extends to the acquisition of tech products such as smartphones, computers, tablets, and game consoles. With the rapid transition to remote work, many individuals proactively invested in personal computing devices to enhance their productivity, rather than relying on their employers for equipment provision.

Conversely, individuals facing reduced working hours or economic uncertainty opted to postpone their tech purchases. On a global scale, the mean age of a technology user’s primary device has exhibited relative stability, averaging at 2.1 years old over the past five years. However, a closer examination reveals notable variations across different countries.

The affluent and highly educated among China’s population has consistently maintained access to the latest tech devices. Nevertheless, a recent delay in 2023 has cast uncertainty on their leading position, potentially aligning them with the global average in the near future. In contrast, consumers in the UK, who initially deferred tech device purchases, have demonstrated a two-year consecutive uptick in acquisitions. Consequently, their average device age now ranks second among surveyed countries.

Meanwhile, online adults in Germany and Japan have displayed a penchant for holding onto their primary devices longer compared to their international counterparts. These nuanced trends offer valuable insights for technology marketers, researchers, analysts, and industry professionals seeking to navigate evolving consumer preferences and market dynamics. Report [TUP_doc_2023_0824_year] in TUP Lenses: Devices; PCs; Mobile Phones; Tablets

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Usage guidelines: This document may be freely shared within and outside your organization in its entirety and unaltered. It may not be used with a generative AI system without separate licensing and express written permission. To share or quote excerpts, please contact MetaFacts.